About your Search

20130127
20130127
STATION
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 5
SFGTV 4
WBFF (FOX) 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
MSNBC 3
MSNBCW 3
WBAL (NBC) 3
WTTG 3
KRCB (PBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
WETA 2
KBCW (CW) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 52
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
commission on civil rights set up by president eisenhower in 1857. this is about half an hour. >> on your screen now is a well-known face for c-span viewers. that's mary frances berry, professor at the university of pennsylvania and also the author several books. with university of pennsylvania today to chat to her about this book, "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" . mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began? >> guest: the civil rights missions started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state, but the way the united states is in or on the road because of the racism going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seem to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether it is one chain or some discrimination taking place in the country said the idea was that eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to save the civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told
the san francisco civil rights ordinance. i am tiny [inaudible] and my comments are on behalf for a safe san francisco. as you know the coalition worked to address accountability and transparency and san francisco police department relationship with federal counter terrorism agencies and one that we worked on is within the san francisco police department between the federal bureau of investigation in the joint task force. as part of that relationship sfpd entered into a secret agreement with the fbi that did away with decades of progress in san francisco. members of this coalition have worked with supervisor jane kim's office to pass this ordinance and make sure that local and state standards apply and requires transparency in the process and that the chief issue a report on the mission by them. this was supported by civil rights organizations, community and bar organizations. it was passed unanimously by the board of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we
on the mission by them. this was supported by civil rights organizations, community and bar organizations. it was passed unanimously by the board of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we were not notified of the report being issued today. indeed we found about it a couple of days ago by happenstance. we are shocked by the lack of substance. when members met with the chief in 2012 he assured us he would include information which we outlined in a letter sent to him on june 8, and to address another question that was presented by commissioner several meetings happened with the chief and staff happened in july and september and after the signing of the ordinance. in short we are disappointed that despite the verbal assurances this report failed to include anymore any useful information regarding the work and this lack of information makes it impossible for the public to have true accountability to know what the police department is doing with regard to this is
his journey from teenage civil rights act to this present at the 1963 march on washington to editor of the attacking juniors papers. he includes encounters many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including ella baker, stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> thanks for joining man out her words. >> your boat, "martin's dream" is then no more an history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and your very candid about your life. you also cover new insight as an historian to the life and legacy of dr. mart luther king junior. what prompted you to read the book this way? >> i wanted to write some thing to mark its 50th anniversary in business 50 years of my life, of king's legacy and his life coincided with my coming of age. so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt i had connect it to the king legacy and yet i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> well, it's an excellent read. you an
that is powerful and does show up among civil rights activists. the more i looked a connection with russia nuia it is more widespread. think of rosa parks they all had garvey connections. there is a picture of african-american in politics that is much more complicated than we want to acknowledge. we have come to terms with our past by constructing a narrative about house slavery ends and freedom is ultimately realized so the civil-rights movement becomes the crucial and point*. and episodes, a people's movements that don't fit into better very problematic. also the scholars across the political spectrum who have an investment to deny it to. i had a lot of push back of anything i have written written, that part of what i discovered, the movement is still alive, there is a chapter in philadelphia, i organized a conference three years ago, a scholarly conference on nuia but at the last minute i advertise it in the local newspaper and 150 garvey-ites showed up. >> host: what is the garvey-ites political focus? >> guest: nuia, there are some chapters, the one in philadelphia, some in the united stat
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
issues and how that's a civil rights concern and that book has taken off and inspired a lot of people and lead to the human rights commission's hearing that happened and i think as a commission we should definitely as uncomfortable and difficult this topic is we're not shying away from looking at it. we might have a different analysis but it's important to take that time so thank you. >> i want to be careful. our officers in san francisco are diverse. it's one of the most diverse in the country. we have training and occ does a mag 95-cent job looking at that and. >> >> making sure things are race thought ral and you have to be. >> >> careful when you throw things out there and our officers are the best in the business. i was speaking to officer monroe and the guy said -- >> he did that in the context of his work. >> his work. >> i got your back inspector. >> he made that distinction many times. >> right. >> put him out there in a muni uniform to buy them. we have to be careful and i love the work you're doing and work with us and don't lose that concern for the community. dr. m
. there are no reported injuries. one of the greatest soldiers in the civil-rights movement has died. vernon dobson. in the early 1960's, he led protest to integrate parts and committed his life to social justice. as the pastor of baltimore's union baptist church was a major figure for four decades. we had a chance to speak with 96-year-old and miller who worked with the reverend for the food bank. >> the fact that he did something. he did not just ring his hands and say, is not this terrible? he said something can be done about this. >> in a state meant, mayor stephanie rawlings-blake said we must give thanks to the reverend for his bravery, honesty and righteous perseverance in the face of cruelty and racism. the reverend was 89. one community organization came together today to organize a plan to reduce crime in the city. the baltimore guarded angels held their second community meeting bringing together police, community leaders and officials to discuss ways that everyone can get involved to lower crime. >> what we hope to do is bring this group of people together and come up with some like- min
. yes. >> and i said civil rights, you know what i meant. >> yes. >> and -- . >> this is lovely. >> what we have are 10 types and amber types. you are seeing a young girl and we don't have the photographer identified. >> isn't she lovely? >> yes, she is. >> and this is -- i never know? and this is the version, one of the early versions of the emancipation proclamation, the centerpiece of the collection and the exhibition. it was published in september of 1862. >> wow. >> and this is an amazing moment, given the 1 fiftyth anniversary of the emancipation proclamation that we have the document that is on display at moad until may. >> oh, my goodness, that gives me goose bumps to think about it. >> that is amazing. >> and this is extraordinary. you have the history and art. >> yes. >> and the culture. >> absolutely. >> represented. >> absolutely. >> and for people who haven't been, and i know there are a few out there who miss out on the street. >> uh. >> what is the most important thing you want them to take away? this is another piece this is a work that is portraits of the family. so you
. [laughter] >> i was lucky enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch monnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they disvered theyave e leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion, but the president, like any reelected president, essentially, absent a national event where he becomes a dramatic figure, watches his popularity be rationed out day- by-day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe that he will be as stron
a bad signal to society of repression and limitation of civil rights guaranteed by the constitution of the russian federation. >> several russian cities have already passed similar local laws. the move to legislate on the federal level enjoys popular support. surveys showed 2/3 of the russian public find homosexuality morally unacceptable. the bill has been criticized by human-rights groups, including the kremlin's human rights council. bbc news in moscow. >> stocks rose today as the euro hit an 11-month high. investors took heart that europe's financial crisis may have eased. it is ironic as the situation improves, the real economic situation for many europeans its worst -- gets worse. the british economy shrunk more than expected. the belgian economy is just as bleak. throughout northern and southern europe, the fear is losing your job. >> the fire has been burning for three months fell, who arming the striking workers. they are the latest victims of europe's economic crisis. say goodbye to the sprawling ford factory in eastern belgium. it is shutting down. with europe in recessio
, civil rights and as you mentioned stonewall manhattan's west village where the modern gay rights movement was born. a couple of things happen. harry reid and mitch mcconnell of reaching someort of agreement on the filibuster. nothing profound. also, they will raise the debtbt ceiling tmay 18. how will this have an impact on the president? >> they are still going to -- they he not gotten over the defeat from november 6. we are going to tie everything to the debt ceiling.. now they have the letter. it discovered that they have no leverage. now have to find a way to back down. this is their face saving device to k kick it down the road until may.y. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the house republicans. >> agree with that? >> all with respect colby's opinion. the president, like any reelected president essentially, absent a national event where he becomes the dominant and central dramatic fire, watches his popularity be rationed out day by day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe he will be as strong a year from now. i think what we are facing iss not
it was understood as an incredible affirmation of the humanity and civil rights of african americans. >> desegregating the public schools. >> desegregating the public schools, rejecting separate and unequal. but the truth was, it really didn't desegregate the schools even until today. roe v. wade, which was won, the whole idea of women's equality under the constitution was in its infancy. there had been almost no decisions in 1973 recognizing discrimination against women as prohibited by the constitution. roe v. wade comes down, and it's not understood as an affirmation of women's personhood, that we don't lose our human rights when we become pregnant. but almost overnight the public health situation dramatically improved, not only because women had access to legal abortion, but they didn't have to carry to term pregnancies when they weren't healthy. and so it was a dramatic change in the practicality. but what we're still very much fighting is an understanding and a respect for the fact that women, whatever their decisions are during pregnancy, remain full persons under the law. >>
-ranging federal civil- rights law that prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities. title two of the ada addresses access to public services, including public transportation for persons with disabilities. it requires transit operators to call out stops at transfer points, major intersections, and major destinations, and to announce particular stocks requested by customers with disabilities. stop announcements are especially important for passengers who are blind or have low vision. these individuals cannot travel independently if they are not assured of getting off at their intended destination point. ♪
ceremony began with an invocation by myrlie evers-williams, widow of slain civil rights leader medgar evers and the first laywoman to give an inaugural prayer. >> we invoke the prayers of our grandmothers, who taught us to pray, god, make me a blessing. >> reporter: music included the brooklyn tabernacle choir. >> the oath i have sworn before you today, like the one recited by others who serve in this capitol, was an oath to god and country. >> reporter: the president cited god many times in his address. he laid out a liberal vision to the nation, which included an explicit endorsement of gay rights. >> our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> reporter: that was praised by some faith-based leaders who called this "the most lgbt-friendly" inauguration in history. but religious conservatives were critical, calling the statement "strident and divisive." many evangelicals are still upset that reverend louie giglio, who was originally set to give the inaugural benediction, withdrew because of controversy over a sermon against h
a reasonable amount of prosecuted. tte departmenn of ustice is now probing whether an derson's civil rights were violated duringg incident. - 3 suupendeddwithhut paa. they still ace an internal affairs inveetigation.... afttr.... he... was... driven - outtof the ity.../ ,intoo.. howard countyy.... and... dropped off by olice... with only his clothes,.../ minus his shoes. johnson as 16 years old,.../ two baltimoree.. police pffiicrs,.../ miiton smith... and... tyronee francis.... picked him up... in west baltimore....// johnson says... they left him... with no hoes, no soccs, no moneyyand no phonn... in theemiddle... teen... eeentually called howard county police... aad... áthhyá... pickkd him up... at... patapsco ssate park.../. friday,.../ a ... jury... ruled in... johnson's... faaor.../ ordering... a... 500--thousand dollar juddmeet. investigators re probing a huge fiie that raceddthroogh a rosedaleestrip mall today. today. they're ppobing whether a grease fire at restaurant may have started phe incident.; the fire hit spread to neighboring ly --3 busine
in the civil rights movement has died. reverend dobson led the protests and committed his life to social justice and equality. he was a major figure in a faith community for four decades. we had a chance to speak with 96-year-old anne miller who worked with dobson to start the maryland food bank and asked what she remembers about him. >> the fact that he did something. he didn't just wring his hands and say, isn't it terrible? he said something can be done about this, and he went ahead and did it. >> in a statement baltimore mayor stephanie rawlings-blake said we must give thanks to reverend dobson for his faith in the face of cruelty and race im. >> and a senator said i was proud to call him friend and his death is a loss for anyone who cares about equal opportunity for all. reverend dobson was 86 years old. >> coming up, getting the most out of college financial aid. and -- >> it is a favorite of area animal lovers. after the break we take you live to the pet expo. >> and we do have a nice warm-up in the seven-day forecast but also a little ice for tomorrow morning's commute. >> welc
next guest, henry marsh at the forefront of the civil rights battle. he handled more than 50 school desegregation cases and innovated strategies to battle employment discrimination, which is what makes the action of his conservative colleagues in the general assembly worthy of condemnation. when mr. marsh went to washington, d.c. last week on martin luther king day to witness president obama's second inauguration, republicans in the state senate used his absence to gerrymander the commonwealth map. joining me from richmond is virginia state senator, henry marsh. nice to have you mr. marsh. >> good morning. >> first i want to say thank you for joining us. i understand how had to go to the early services at church this morning to make time to be here. i greatly appreciate that. >> i didn't want to miss church. the lord made all this happen. >> in fact, let me ask you in part about how angry you are about how your absence has made possible this new map. >> actually, i'm ashamed and embarrassed for my state. somebody's absent almost two or three days a week. never was there an attempt t
but -- . >> look at all the chafes people said couldn't happen: women's rights, civil rights, don't ask/don't tell. sometimes quickly and sometimes slowly, champ will happen when we work for it as a country. >> let us come together to across the nation to re-instate the assault weapon's ban. >> reporter: speakers called for limiting the size of ammunitions clips and to require background checks for all gun sales. after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, eleanor holmes norton said the opus is on ordinary citizens to get involved. >> no more moaning. it's time to do something about it. >> reporter: there were a few people who opposed restricting assault weapons and magazines and requiring all gun purchases to have background checks. >> this won't work or make a difference. >> reporter: what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys who commit the crimes. >> reporter: a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house for success of the obama administration's efforts to control guns. education secretary arne duncan reminded participants that it's going to take more than
, but -- >> look at all the changes people said couldn't happen. civil rights, women's rights, don't ask don't tell. sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> let us come together from across in nation, reinstate the assault weapons ban. [ applause ] >> reporter: speakers called for limiting the size of ammunition clips and for requiring background checks for all gun sales. after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, d.c.'s congressional delegate said the onus is now on ordinary citizens to get involved. >> no more moaning. it's time to do something about it. [ applause ] >> reporter: in the crowd there were a few people who opposed restricting assault weapons or ammunition magazines or requiring background checks for all gun purchases. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> reporter: what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys who commit the crimes. >> reporter: a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house for the success of the administration's to control guns. arnie duncan reminded participants it wil
couldn't happen. civil rights, womens rights, don't ask don't tell, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys that commit crimes. >> a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house to wish the obama administration success in passing tighter gun control laws. >> tens of thousands of protestors took to the streets of san francisco for the anniversary of legalizing abortion. pro-life protestors marched down market street from the civic center to justin herman plaza demanding roe v wade be turned over. a law student who testified before congress about contraception was a guest speaker. >> there is a more profound sight about access. about affordability and insurance coverage and making sure people especially in rural areas have access. >> i would like to see everyone question abortion more. they say it should be legal and safe they don't talk about rare. >> as many as 40,000 people attended the pro-life rally. it's the biggest a
the officers of justicc is now probing f -3 &pwhether an derson's civil rights were violated during the incident. 0731 i fell bad, it's not right...oc::i stood there and watched them kill my chiid 0744 0744 the ooficers involved remain suspended with paa. they 3till faceean internal affairs 3 a parkville waterrmain reak leaves 80 omes without wattr. a viewee sent us thii photo of aaer shooting early fifty feet into the air aa thee site of the break at 8300 tapu court. the geyser forced it's way through the asphalt to create a very unwelcomed fountain. the department of puulic wwrks shut the water offfand ot the geyser under control. they're working on ressoring service t thosse80 homes. social media presents new coocerns or those wwo but now lawmakeer in nebraska are working on a legislationnovvr who ontrols legislation woull allow a new - someone's state be pprmitted to terminate their lovee one's online account. "last year, an individuall plient of mine n her early 60s passed away. she was who guessed correctly at her facebook account passworddand - her wall that
't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill, and in an instant johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very very very much. >> last fall caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall. it's clear he has made johnson come alive for many readers. >> do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying look what he is doing now. >> he got excited talking about johnson's rise to power as we turn to the final book he is writing now about johnson's president and vietnam, his demeanor has suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon
takes legislation that kennedy introduced, that was stalled, really was not going to pass, civil rights, the tax cut bill, and, in an instant, johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very much. >> chris: last fall, he took part in a library of congress book festival, on the national mall. and it was clear he made johnson come alive for many readers. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him, you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying, look what he's doing now! >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rist, as we tur book, he's writing now, about johnson's presidency and vietnam, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams, that are destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish the last book? >> well, sure! but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four
prosecuted. the department & of justice is now robing whether an dersonns civil -3 rights were viooaaed during the inccdent. 3 0731 i fell ad, it's not right...occ i stood there and watched thee 3 kill my ccild 0744 0744 the officerssinnolved remain suupenddd with pay. they still face an nternal affairs investtgation.... -3 3 the f-a-a may have stopped boeing from flying its 7-87 - dreamliners... but tte companyy is moving full steam aheed in production. production.a boeing spokesperson confirmed he company is not only keepiig its current productton scheddle for the jets... but it also plans to double year.a shut-down would be costly fr boeing and ts suppliers... and the company still has aa order of 800 dreamliners planes to fill for airlines.earliee thissmonth, the f---a grouuded all 50 dreamliners around the world after lithiim battery fires - broke ut in tww jets. investigatorsshave ot figuredd out hat caused he fires yet. if you try to buy stamps this morning... yyu'll notice that the cost hassgone up..he u-s postal service aissd the costt -3 of
in the civil rights movement has died. vern nonnathaniel dobson. in the early 1960's, reverend dobson committed his life to social justice and equality. he was a major figure in the faith community for four decades. we got a chance to speak to 96-year-old anne miller who worked with reverend dobson to start the maryland food bank. we asked her what she remembers about him. >> he did something. he didn't just wring his hands and say, it's terrible. he knew something could be done about it, and he did it. >> mayor stephanie rawlings-blake said we must give thanks to reverend dobson for his honesty and perseverance in the face of racism and cruelty. another released a statement saying i am proud to call him friend and his death is a loss for anyone who cares about equal for all. >> and gun rights supporters are finding ways to demonstrate their passions over the gun control issue. more from washington. >> thousands of demonstrators joined a quiet march through the streets of washington to send a message to washington about gun violence. among those in attendance, about 100 parents from newtown,
time ago. it was 1967. and i remember very well senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill in 1968 was passed. i discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do. but there was a time when senator baker said he was in everett dirksen's office, the man who had the job senator mcconnell now has. he was the republican leader then. he said he heard the telephone ring and heard only one end of the conversation, but senator dirksen was saying, no, mr. president, i cannot come down and have a drink with you tonight. i did that last night and louella is very unhappy with me. and that was the conversation. about 30 minutes later there was a rustle out in the outer office, the office senator mcconnell holds, and two beagles came in and lyndon johnson, the president, said to the republican leader, everett, if you don't have a drink wh me, i'm down here to have one with you and the disperiod for 45 -- and they disappeared for 45 minutes. the point of that is it was in that very office, the republican leader's office in 1968, the next year
support and that i believe it's going to make a big change. >> our civil liberties, as enumerated in the bill of rights are absolutely protected by the second amendment. without the second amendment it is a slippery slope to evoke oour other civil liberties. >> nra ceo is expected to testify at a senate hearing. >>> violence continues in egypt. 30 people killed, hundreds injured in protests. the egyptian troops have been deployed to try to control the violence. the protests erupted after 21 people were sentenced to death in connection with a deadly soccer riot that killed 74 people last year. the violence comes a day after nine people were killed in protests against egyptian president mohamed morsi. >>> much of the country stuck in a deep freeze after a mild start to winter. chicago got the first inch of snow in almost a year on friday. tomorrow, ice could lead to travel delays and power outages in the midwest. southern states have been bath battling winter weather from tennessee to the carolinas. streets and sidewalks were coated in ice and snow and we got out of the deep freeze
like school choice, which i think is the civil rights issue of the next generation, but you know, school choice, what it's fundamentally about is bringing competition to improve public schools and providing hope and opportunity for kids that are trapped and being denied a fair shot at the american dream. whether it's something like social security, personal accounts, which as much as republicans love to put on our green eyeshades and talk about solvency, far more important is the ability of those at the bottom of the economic ladder to accumulate resources and assets that they can use to pass on to their kids and grandkids to buy a home, to start a business, to get an education. whether it is taxes and regulation. let me give a perfect example. one of the best slogans that came out of this last campaign was "you built that." and it was in response to barack obama's terrible but revealing comment, "you didn't build that, you didn't build that small business." that was one of the best moments of the last campaign. but i wish we'd taken a different tack on it because that was a slog
close to the public hospital. on the 50th anniversary of the 50th -- on 50 the anniversary of the civil rights act. -- on the anniversary of thcivil rights act. on a closing note, just a report came out that the state about alma -- of alabama has revised -- if you just paid an expert -- if you would just play an exit of the governor. guest: a couple of things he mentioned. one is the challenge that local governments have. when you look ahead, now the state to coming out of the recession, one of the things they are still dealing with our problems at the local level. states often have to step in when local governments have financial problems. in pennsylvania, michigan, rhode island, the problems of local governments are the problems of state officials. host: we have not heard yet from the governor of alabama for the state of state address that will be coming in a couple of weeks. caller: as we all know, big money from a deep pocket contributors really controls the congress in washington. whether it is the republican house or democratic senate. in my opinion it also controls the white hous
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
right into this. decades after the civil war ended, katherine stone, who we see on the screen, published her memoirs of what she called the gay busy life. that she and her wealthy slave-owning family had led on their 1200-acre plantation in prewar louisiana. the members of her family, she recalled, -- her words -- there was always something going on. formal dining, spend the days, evening parties, riding frolics, fox hunts, and to assist with these and other diversions, katherine added her family had -- again, her words -- quite a corps of servants to keep us well waited on since, naturally, no one expected to wait on himself. katherine stone's younger brothers also -- again her words -- owned a little darky in the quarters who eventually become his body servant. and to generate the wealth that sustained the stone family's life of, again, her words -- luxurious ease, some 150 enslaved human beings toiled in the plantation's cotton and cane field, six days a week, week after week, month after month, year after year. the civil war's outbreak in april of 1861 signaled the beginning of the e
mom to my right is mahassan and my mom to the right is my birth mother, and basically i support civil unions. nobody can't ever tell me that i can't have two mothers because i really do. >> this probably would never have happened 10 or 15 years ago, david zirin. you know that. why is it now that athletes are taking more political issues? >> on this issue in particular it's a great example because to me it's the whole real world sports world dynamic and yes, it's definitely true, the real world over here and the sports world over here, but this moat that separates the two, people are starting to build bridges and in the last five years there's been a national movement state by state for lbgt rights and for marriage equality. and athletes, as one athlete said to me, i quote him in the book. he said, look, it's not like we live on planet jock and only come down here to play games and also not like we watch our own msnbc. you know, that's just for athletes. you know, we're part of this world, too, and when you have more and more athletes who have connections to the lbgt community and a mo
washington journal." >> one of the key themes for any exhibition on the civil war of the twin issues of abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate they came of age when they did because between the two of them, they make issues around emancipation and abolition, issues around human rights and the american freedom on a general not raise specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson puts it to this picture. i will summarize by saying if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, there is a letter going from the bedroom window up to the big wink and as if there is a way in and out without being seen. there is a rooster up here. roosters have a habit of finding a purge and calling to the hen to spend the night with them. the slave is on top of the slave -- the head is on top of the slave quarters. if you look at the white girl in the backyard with a black girl checking if the coast is clear, some say, she is coming to hear the music. she is the mistress or the master's daughter. she is not here to hear the music. nobody is paying attention
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)